15 August 2017 – A new publication entitled “The Right to Development, 30 Years Later: Achievements, Challenges and The Way Forward” has been released by the Geneva Centre for Human Rights Advancement and Global Dialogue (“The Geneva Centre”). The publication is an outcome of a panel discussion that was held on 5 December 2016 at Palais des Nations in Geneva addressing the same subject. The panel debate was arranged by the Geneva Centre and the Permanent Mission of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office in Geneva (UNOG).

The Right to Development, 30 Years Later: Achievements, Challenges and The Way Forward” reviews the panel proceedings and the deliberations that were delivered by renowned global experts who were invited to give their insights on this subject. The publication also includes an intellectual think piece written by Ambassador Zamir Akram, Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on the Right to Development on the lessons learned from the panel meeting that was moderated by the Geneva Centre’s Executive Director Ambassador Idriss Jazairy.

The panel discussion aimed at analysing achievements and progress made towards, as well as challenges ahead for, the attainment of the Right to Development. The discussion aimed at giving a voice to the voiceless and building bridges between developed and developing countries in the mainstreaming of human rights in national and international policies.

The ultimate goal was to revive the same consensus of the international community that served as a backdrop to the adoption of the Declaration as well as earlier UN Resolutions on the Right to Development. The discussion was also an opportunity to mark the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration on the Right to Development, as well as the 2016 International Human Rights Day.

Paper copies of the Geneva Centre’s most recent publication can be obtained by sending an email request to the following email address info@gchragd.org indicating name and postal address of recipient.

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